STRENGTH EVALUATION OF POZZOLANIC CONCRETE CONTAINING CALCINED CERAMIC WASTE AND GLASS WASTE POWDER

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C. Arum
S. P. Akande
S. A. Alabi

Abstract

The problems associated with the production of cement used for concrete such as emission of toxic gases, high energy demand, and natural resources consumption, constitute adverse effects on ecology and the economy. However, the use of construction and demolition wastes such as ceramic tiles and glass waste as a partial replacement for cement will help in mitigating the aforementioned problems. Therefore, this study presents the results of an experimental investigation on the strength property of concrete made by partially replacing cement with Calcined Ceramic Waste (CCW) and Waste Glass Powder (WGP) at binary and ternary levels. A mix ratio of 1:2:4 by weight of the binder, sand, and granite with a water-cement ratio of 0.65 was adopted to produce concrete with characteristic cube strength of 15 N/mm2. Tests carried out include flowability potential of fresh concrete matrix and compressive


The problems associated with the production of cement used for concrete such as emission of toxic gases, high energy demand, and natural resources consumption, all constitute adverse effects on ecology and the economy. However, utilization of finely-ground construction and demolition wastes such as ceramic tiles and glass waste to partially replace cement will help in mitigating the aforementioned problems. This is therefore a report of the findings of an experimental investigation on the strength property of concrete made by partial substitution of cement with Calcined Ceramic Waste (CCW) and Waste Glass Powder (WGP) at binary and ternary levels. A mix ratio of 1:2:4 by weight of the binder, sand, and granite with a water to cement ratio of 0.65 was adopted to produce concrete with characteristic cube strength of 15 N/mm2. Tests carried out include flowability potential of fresh concrete matrix and compressive strength. The results of tests carried out on mixes of different replacement levels of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) with CCW and WGP show that at maturity age of 90 days, concrete compressive strength decreased as the substitution level of CCW and WGP increased except at 5%CCW with 5%WGP (C5G5) and 5%CCW with 10%WGP (C5G10) replacements which gave strengths of 19.03 N/mm2 and 19.00 N/mm2 respectively. These values although less than 22.07 N/mm2 which is the value of the control, nevertheless satisfy the minimum strength requirement for the concrete grade used. Therefore, in addition to providing concrete of usable quality while simultaneously reducing the amounts of Portland cement required, the pozzolanic concrete produced is also eco-friendly and will help reduce global green gas emission and promote sustainability of construction materials.

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References

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