ASSESSMENT OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF CONCRETE PRODUCED WITH FINE AGGREGATE FROM DIFFERENT LOCATIONS IN KADUNA STATE

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U. Wilson
I. Balarabe
O. C. Eze
A. Adefila
S. Odeyemi

Abstract

Building Collapse from failure of structures has been a major concern for researchers today. This is traceable to several factors, one of which is the quality of the materials used during construction, as the quality of concrete is known to depend on the type of cement, water and aggregates used. Since coarse and fine aggregates occupy up to 70-75% of the concrete volume, it is necessary that the quality of aggregates be astutely ascertained. The objective of this research is to establish the best locations of fine aggregate in Kaduna state in order to facilitate its selection for construction purposes. A prescribed mix of 0.55/1:1.5:3 targeting a concrete of grade C20 was adopted for 100 x 100 x 100mm cubes. This research examined the engineering properties of fine aggregate which are used in concrete works in Kaduna. Fifteen sources from the three senatorial districts in Kaduna (Kaduna North, Kaduna South and Kaduna Central) were identified from which fine aggregate samples were collected and transported to the Nigerian Defence Academy, Afaka, for examination. The test results revealed that the specific gravity of the samples falls between 2.34 and 2.85 and fineness modulus between 2.36 and 3.3. The compressive strength after curing for 7 days varies between 18.5 N/mm2 and 26.4 N/mm2, and after 28 days curing varies between 23.3 N/mm2 and 30.1 N/mm2 all for same prescribed mix, cement grade and coarse aggregate type. Concrete produced with fine aggregate from Kaduna South L.G shows the highest strength after 28 days while the concrete from Kajuru L.G has the lowest compressive strength after 28 days.

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